DinosaurJS

DinosaurJS

June 20 and 21, 2019

DinosaurJS is a non-profit, community-driven JavaScript and Open Web conference in Denver, Colorado. This year, it will be located at the Studio Loft inside of the Denver Performing Arts Center on 14th in Curtis in lower downtown.

DinosaurJS is part of the JSConf Family of Events and adheres to the JSConf Code of Conduct.

Mademoiselle of Ceremonies

Jasmine Greenaway

Jasmine is an NYC based developer and Cloud Advocate at Microsoft and adjunct professor teaching basic web development at a local college. Outside of work, she volunteers as a co-organizer of BrooklynJS. Jasmine advocates for remote work environments, easier access to technology and the resources on how to use them, and elevating the work and voices of people of color in tech.

Speakers

Sarah Drasner

The Future of Web Animation

We talk a lot about how to animate on the web, and what’s possible in browsers today, but where is animation heading? In this talk, we’ll start with some bleeding edge techniques such as native-like page transitions with nuxt, but then we’ll push it further. The intersection of health and animation with biofeedback sensors and Vue, the future of 3d in the browser complete with interviews with people who are writing these specs… this talk will show that in terms of animation on the web, we’re just getting started.

Saimon Sharif

Codemods: Refactoring JavaScript Using JavaScript

For large, mature JavaScript codebases with many contributing engineers, it’s very difficult to modernize and change large pieces of extant code. When a library you use has a breaking change, there’s a lot of work to update older, neglected pieces of code. With codemods, engineers can programmatically refactor and create project-wide code changes to modernize their applications while saving hundreds of development hours and dramatically reducing tech debt.

Cassidy Williams

Building a Babel 7 Processor

At CodePen, the team's main goal is to reduce the need for a workflow setup to quickly prototype, build, and/or show off your code. Cassidy recently built out one of the team's latest releases: an entirely new Babel processor from scratch. In this talk, she'll go through the reasoning behind the processor, how Babel plugins work, how the processor was added into the Pen editor, and the potential future for CodePen with that work in place.

Rich Trott

A Partial Taxonomy of Test Unreliability

Humorous, fast-paced, and not-entirely-useless presentation of a taxonomy of causes for test unreliability, treated as though it were a biological taxonomy. Or not.

Fred K. Schott

Pika: Reimagining the Registry

Question the nature of your reality. JavaScript fatigue & overly-complex tooling can feel like inevitable problems in 2019, but in reality they are symptoms of a deeper problem. This talk explores some lesser-known issues in modern web development & the initiatives quietly working to solve them.

Lori Culberson

The Art of Teaching

Many senior developers feel compelled to give back to the tech community. They offer to teach classes, pair with less experienced engineers and serve as mentors. This talk will help those engineers learn the most effective teaching strategies used in high performing K-12 classrooms. It will cover: how to check for understanding, how to assess a student’s learning style, why you should avoid the use of sarcasm, when you should stop talking and listen

Hayley Denbraver

A Postmortem on the Ingen Incident

Hayley has prepared her report about the events that occurred on Isla Nublar and will present her findings to the board. Before we vote on whether to restart the project, we need to understand why the failure occurred and hear any recommendations.

Tejas Kumar

A Tale of Two Architectures

Progressive Web Apps have the capability to unify application development: creating apps using Web Technologies that run on most other devices and feel at home, using native design patterns. This talk explores a real-world application, first built as a native application, later rebuilt as a PWA and the tradeoffs and benefits that come with each approach.

Jana Beck

Data Science in the Browser: DX & UX

Web browsers are not a particularly friendly environment for doing data science, but TensorFlow.js—among other tools—is developing rapidly and making it possible. In this talk, we’ll focus on the DX and UX of one particular clustering technique (t-stochastic neighbors embedding (tSNE)) in the browser.

Daria Caraway

How to Have an Amicable Breakup With a JavaScript Library

Choosing a JavaScript library is a lot like dating: the longer you commit yourself, the messier it is when you decide to break up. Whether something better comes along, or the library is deprecated, changing a dependency often requires a lot of time or leaves the code in a less attractive state. Let me show you a technique that can ease the pain of this situation.

Organizers

Steve Kinney

Chief Panic Officer

Jessica West

Chief Money Officer

Mike Pack

Chief Calm Officer

Schedule

Conference Day, June 20th

8:15am
Breakfast
Full hot breakfast served!
9:15am
Opening Ceremonies
Jasmine Greenaway
Welcome to DinosaurJS 2019
9:30am
Talk
Cassidy Williams
Building a Babel 7 Processor
10:00am
Talk
Hayley Denbraver
A Postmortem on the Ingen Incident
10:30am
Announcement
Will Klein
10:35am
Morning Break
Coffee, tea and water available
11:10am
Talk
Daria Caraway
How to have a amicable breakup with a Javascript library
11:40am
Talk
Saimon Sharif
Codemods: Refactoring JavaScript using JavaScript
12:10pm
Lunch
Lunch served on-prem of the Studio Loft
1:10pm
Talk
Sarah Drasner
The Future of Web Animation
1:40pm
Talk
Fred K. Schott
Pika: Reimagining the Registry
2:10pm
Workshop Announcement + Break
Workshop Q&A
2:50pm
Talk
Lori Culberson
The Art of Teaching
3:20pm
Talk
Jana Beck
Data science in the browser: DX & UX
3:50pm
Break
After party announcement
4:35pm
Talk
Rich Trott
A Partial Taxonomy of Test Unreliability
5:05m
Talk
Tejas Kumar
A Tale of Two Architectures
5:35pm
Closing Ceremonies
Jasmine Greenaway
Thank you day one!

Workshops

On the second day (June 21st, for those of you keeping track at home), we'll have a series of free workshops for all attendees. Each workshop will be three hours long and held twice: once in the morning and again in the afternoon.

Dealing with my Emotion, a CSS in JS Workshop

Manny Carrera IV and Will Klein, Workday

In this workshop, you’ll learn the ins and outs of writing CSS in JS! We’ll take a React-based app with classic stylesheets, and step-by-step, migrate to CSS in JS using Emotion. We’ll cover both the benefits and the trade-offs of managing styles in JavaScript. Not only will you learn all the ways to leverage Emotion, you will become a Style Master!

Web Performance with Firebase

David East, Firebase

"How fast should my site load?" It's a simple question, but one that doesn't have a simple answer. There's many pieces to web performance; it doesn't matter if you're using React, Angular, or slicing PSDs to tables (Okay, don't do that). In order to understand the performance of your site you need the right tools and more importantly the right mindset. This workshop will help you grow that mindset while building a website in three stages. Stage one: Learn important concepts around web performance, such as latency and bandwidth. Stage two: Measure web performance (using Firebase Performance Monitoring) and learn about common perf metrics like FCP. Stage three: Diagnose problems and deploy fixes. At the end of this workshop you'll be able to look at Firebase or the Chrome DevTools and understand what's causing poor performance. We'll also touch on tools like Docker to deploy serverless backends on Cloud Run. So bring your laptops and get ready to be able to really answer "How fast should my site load?"

TwilioQuest

Dominik Kundel, Twilio

This isn’t your typical technical workshop. You won’t show up, sit down, and sit through hours of PowerPoint. You're the boss of your own learning agenda. Choose what you want to participate in, at the pace you prefer. TwilioQuest is an interactive, self-paced game where you learn how to Twilio. TwilioQuest introduces Twilio products, features, and concepts while rewarding you with experience points and loot. There's no faster way to master Voice, SMS, Video or our other products. Whether you’ve been writing code for decades or you just started a bootcamp, you can come to level up your development skills. You’ll learn how to get up and running at scale with guidance and support from experts.

Go For Non-Go Developers

Brenna Martenson, Imagine Analytics

Go is becoming an increasingly necessary tool in the belt of “languages you should know to be relevant.” Although the beauty of the language is in its simplicity, the transition from JavaScript or Ruby can still be a little bumpy. In this workshop, we’ll work through the basic of Go, paying particular attention to pitfalls you may encounter transitioning from a language like JavaScript. This workshop is designed for developers with little to no Go knowledge, although collaboration is a key part of not-having-a-shitty-workshop-experience so all skill levels are welcome!

Dino Dig

Grab a sturdy shovel and your finest archeology hat. It's time to harness your inner Mary Anning and Barnum Brown. DinosaurJS would like to donate, on your behalf, to a handful of awesome non-profits working to make the world a better place. Let's find some dinosaurs!

Here's how it works:

  1. Take a photo of yourself and something dinosaur related.
  2. Post it on Twitter and tag #dinojs.
  3. We DM you a link where you get to donate $10 to one of the following non-profits.
  • Center for Democracy & Technology

    CDT

    CDT is a champion of global online civil liberties and human rights, driving policy outcomes that keep the internet open, innovative, and free.

  • Center for Democracy & Technology

    NPower

    NPower creates pathways to economic prosperity by launching digital careers for military veterans and young adults from underserved communities.

  • Center for Democracy & Technology

    KoBoToolbox

    KoBoToolbox is a suite of tools for field data collection for use in challenging environments, like humanitarian crises in developing countries. Our software is free and open source.

Don't see a non-profit you like? You can specify your own.